TSA PAT DOWNS

 

WAY TOO INTRUSIVE

I am a TSA Precheck frequent flyer, which lets you breeze through airport security without having to remove your shoes, empty out your computer case, etc.

In order to have this status for a five-year period, you pay an $85 fee to have a background check done on you — and you also have to provide fingerprints.

Even with this status, however, you still have to go through a metal detector. And since I have two metal hips, I invariably set off the metal detectors when I go through security.

Because of this, I am subjected to disgusting, humiliating and sexually intrusive “pat downs” by TSA personnel.

These “pat downs” have become more and more intrusive, and they consist of extreme groping around your groin area.

With all of the recent sensational sexual harassment allegations, where is the outrage about this practice by the TSA?

There are less invasive ways to find potential weapons — like using metal detecting wands — without having your intimate areas fondled and grabbed by a complete stranger.

The TSA must have a better system.

Tad Holtsinger, St. Johns

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HARASSMENT

TOO MANY TOO GOOD AT IT

Why are all these CEOs, corporate types, members of Congress, etc., now getting sexual harassment training?

They already know how to do it.

Diane Tabbott, Arlington

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REPUBLICAN TAX PLAN

MEDICARE CLEARLY AT RISK

The Republican tax bill carries with it a large red warning flag for all taxpayers, and particularly seniors.

All of the experts reviewing the scale of the planned tax cuts warn that the national debt would increase by $3 trillion to $5 trillion over time.

Conservatives will use this increase to find methods of reducing the debt.

But there are only two main areas of spending that can be attacked to realistically address this rising debt:

Medicare and the military.

Since history has proven that the military is rarely subjected to funding decreases, the only source for solving the national debt is cutting Medicare.

And that has long been the desire of Republicans like House Speaker Paul Ryan.

Harry Lang, Arlington

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CORRINE BROWN IN JAIL

DON’T BET ON IT

Former U.S. Rep. Corrine Brown may have been sentenced to five years in jail.

But the idea that she will serve jail time is a myth.

And everyone will be happy.

Those who support Brown know she can appeal the sentence — and win.

Those who are against her will be satisfied that she was actually sentenced to jail.

Brown will certainly appeal her sentence, and look for that to take three to four years to resolve.

If that fails, she will try another way to appeal the sentence, and that will be another three to four years.

By then, Brown will be in her 80s, and Brown’s physician will have had six to eight years to discover some newly found medical problem that she suffers from — one that requires specialized treatment that can’t be provided in prison.

The end result:

Brown won’t do a day in jail.

Al Rabassa, Jacksonville

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TAX REFORM

WHAT’S WRONG WITH IT?

I just don’t understand why anyone would say, “I don’t want a tax cut. I want people like U.S. Rep John Conyers and Sen. Al Franken to keep spending all my money that I send to the government.”

But then, I’m not a Democrat.

According to statistics 49 percent of Americans don’t pay income taxes.

How many of them are Democrats?

I have no idea, but I would bet the majority didn’t vote for President Donald Trump.

When I hear an American citizen say they don’t want a tax cut, I just wonder how much “free stuff” they are already getting.

Jay Cochran, Jacksonville

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HARASSMENT INCIDENTS

WHAT ABOUT WOMEN?

I read the recent article in the Times-Union titled “Harassment debate escalates, confuses an issue.”

The list of culprits seems to increase weekly and includes everyone from politicians like Sen. Al Franken and U.S. Rep. John Conyers to entertainment figures like Harvey Weinstein, Charlie Rose and Matt Lauer.

Do you think there might have been some temptations that contributed to bringing these men to their fallen status?

How about the women who strive for the attention of men by dressing in provocative fashion — and by showing more of their “goods” than they should?

William Smith, Jacksonville