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Probation revocation hearing set for woman convicted of federal explosives charges

After causing scene at tattoo parlor, woman charged with DUI and possession of meth, polic say

Posted: August 21, 2014 - 4:55pm

ATLANTA | A warrant has been issued for a north Georgia woman who was arrested on new charges less than six months after a federal judge sentenced her to probation on federal explosives charges, court records show.

U.S. District Judge Richard Story signed an order for a warrant for Celia Savage and a probation revocation hearing will likely be scheduled. The order was signed Aug. 14 and was filed with the court clerk Wednesday.

A lawyer for Savage said in an email that he had no comment.

Savage, 25, of Cornelia, originally was arrested in May 2012, after federal agents raided her home and found two pipe bombs and multiple guns. She pleaded guilty in July 2013 to making and possessing pipe bombs after reaching a plea agreement with prosecutors.

Story in February sentenced her to six years on probation but warned her that if she got in trouble again he’d send her to prison.

On Aug. 9, Savage was arrested on charges that include possession of methamphetamine, driving under the influence, criminal trespass and possession of prescription drugs with intent to distribute. She has been held in the Hall County jail without bond since her arrest.

Savage went to a tattoo parlor in Flowery Branch and became hostile when she realized the owner of the business was one of the narcotics agents involved in her federal case, federal probation officers wrote in a request for a warrant submitted to Story. She left when asked but came back later intoxicated and demanded service. When she was denied service because she was intoxicated, she intentionally destroyed a glass table, the officers wrote.

She also drove her car drunk that night, and police officers found methamphetamine in her purse and found prescription pills marked for sale in her vehicle, the probation officers wrote.

At her original sentencing, federal prosecutors had asked for three years in prison followed by three years of supervised release, citing the seriousness of the charges, anti-government statements she had posted online and previous run-ins with law enforcement.

Her attorney had argued Savage was immature and suffered from untreated mental illness at the time of her arrest, saying she detonated bombs as a form of release for her anger and frustration and never intended to hurt anyone.

Story said then that the decision on her sentencing was one of the most difficult he’s had to make.

“This may be the worst decision I’ve ever made, and you may make me look like an absolute fool, but I’m going to give you a chance,” he told Savage in February.

 
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