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The Space Shuttle Challenger rolls out to launch pad 39-B, Dec. 25, 1985, in preparation for its scheduled launch on January 22, 1986. This launch will be the first shuttle launch from Kennedy Space Center's pad 39-8. Another first for this launch will be the first private citizen, New Hampshire teacher Christa McAuliffe, to ride the shuttle. (AP Photo/Jim Neihouse)

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This is the official NASA photo of the crew of the Space Shuttle Challenger mission 51L. All seven members of the crew were killed when the shuttle exploded during launch on Jan. 28, 1986. From front left, are: astronauts Michael J. Smith, Francis R. (Dick) Scobee, and Ronald E. McNair. Rear left are: Ellison Onizuka, Christa McAuliffe, Gregory Jarvis, and Judith Resnik. (AP Photo)

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Christa McAuliffe tries out the commander's seat on the flight deck of a shuttle simulator at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, Sept. 13, 1985. McAuliffe is scheduled for a space flight on the Space Shuttle Challenger in January, 1986. (AP Photo)

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The crew for the Space Shuttle Challenger flight 51-L leaves their quarters for the launch pad, Jan. 27, 1986, at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Front to back are Commander Francis Scobee, Mission Spl. Judith Resnik, Mission Spl. Ronald McNair, Payload Spl. Gregory Jarvis, Mission Spl. Ellison Onizuka, teacher Christa McAuliffe, and pilot Michael Smith. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

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In this photo provided by NASA, ice which formed on launch pad 39-B, Jan. 27, 1986, at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, before the ill-fated launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger, is visible in this picture taken just prior to launch by the ice inspection team. The picture shows one of many communications terminals on the launch pad itself. The terminal was reported to be non-operational. (AP Photo/NASA)

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Icicles are visible in this photo taken by a NASA ice inspection team the morning of the Space Shuttle Challenger's final launch, Kennedy Space Center, Fla., Jan. 28, 1986. The icicles are on hand rails and support structure of the Fixed Service Structure, which is used to service the shuttle just before launch. The shuttle, its external fuel tank, and left side solid rocket booster motor, are visible in the background. (AP Photo/NASA)

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A technician uses a drill as he tries to remove a screw holding the handle to the Space Shuttle Challenger hatch, Jan. 27, 1986. The handle problem was causing a delay in launching the "Teacher in Space" flight. (AP Photo/Ed Kolenovsky)

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The Space Shuttle Challenger hatch that was causing a delay in the launch of the "Teacher in Space" flight is pictured on Jan. 27, 1986. First there was a latching and sealing problem, and then the white room crew could not remove the handle, right center on hatch. (AP Photo/Ed Kolenovsky)

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The Space Shuttle Challenger lifts off Pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 11:38 a.m., EST, January 28, 1986. The entire crew of seven was lost in the explosion 73 seconds into the launch. (AP Photo/NASA)

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Spectators in the VIP area at the Kennedy Space Center, Fla., watch as the Space Shuttle Challenger lifts from Pad 39-B, January 28, 1986. The shuttle, carrying a crew of seven, including the first teacher in space, exploded about 73 seconds after launch. All were killed. (AP Photo/Bruce Weaver)

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The Space Shuttle orbiter Challenger lifts off from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, Jan. 28, 1986, in a cloud of smoke with a crew of seven aboard. The shuttle exploded after this photo, taken from atop the Vehicular Assembly Building, was made. (AP Photo/Thom Baur)

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This Jan. 28, 1986 picture provided by NASA shows an unusual flame jutting from the side of a solid rocket booster on the Space Shuttle Challenger during its launch from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. A subsequent explosion killed its crew of seven. (AP Photo/NASA)

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The Space Shuttle Challenger explodes shortly after lifting off from Kennedy Space Center, Fla., Tuesday, Jan. 28, 1986. All seven crew members died in the explosion, which was blamed on faulty o-rings in the shuttle's booster rockets. The Challenger's crew was honored with burials at Arlington National Cemetery. (AP Photo/Bruce Weaver)

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This picture shows the breakup of the space shuttle Challenger January 28, 1986, 78 seconds after liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center. Top arrow shows the Orbiter's left wing. Center arrow shows the Orbiter's main engine; and the bottom arrow shows the Orbiter's forward fuselage. The picture was released Monday, June 9, 1986, in Washington, as part of the Presidential Commission on the space shuttle Challenger accident report. (AP Photo)

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In this Jan. 28, 1986 picture, two unidentified spectators at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., react after they witnessed the explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger. (AP Photo/File)

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The family of Christa McAuliffe, a teacher who was America's first astronaut, realize the horror after the Space Shuttle orbiter Challenger blew apart after liftoff from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 1986. The sister of Christa, Betsy, left, and parents Grace and Ed Corrigan console each other after the explosion. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

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Young Scott McAuliffe's third grade teacher comforts one of her charges as another youngster and a young woman, right, react after seeing the Space Shuttle Challenger explode in midair, killing all aboard, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 1986. The teacher and student are from the Kimbell Elementary School in Concord, N.H., where young McAuliffe, son of space school teacher Christa McAuliffe, is a student. (AP Photo)

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U.S. President Ronald Reagan, center, is surrounded by members of his senior staff as he watches a TV replay of the explosion of the Challenger space shuttle, on February 3, 1986, at the White House in Washington. From left are: Larry Speakes, deputy White House press secretary; Presidential Assistant Dennis Thomas; Special Assistant Jim Kuhn; Reagan; White House Communications Director Patrick Buchanan, and Chief of Staff Donald Regan. (AP Photo/Craig Fujii)

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The American flag in the press site at the Kennedy Space Center, Fla., flies at half-mast, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 1986, following the explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger. NASA said the crew of seven aboard the craft died in the explosion. Launch pad B is shown under the flag. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

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U.S. President Ronald Reagan is shown in the Oval Office in the White House after a televised address to the nation about the Shuttle Challenger explosion on Jan. 28, 1986. (AP Photo/Dennis Cook)

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Florida Times-Union front page from January 29, 1986 the day after the Space Shuttle Challenger exploded on launch from the Kennedy Space Center on Cape Canaveral.

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Father Daniel Messier, right, dries the tears of Concord, New Hampshire, sixth grader Tanya Lee at a memorial service for teacher Christa McAuliffe at St. John's Catholic Church in Concord, Jan. 29, 1986. McAuliffe died on Tuesday in the explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

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National Transportation Safety Board investigator John White kneels in front of the nose cone of the Challenger's right solid rocket booster, April 9, 1986. The right solid rocket booster is suspected by investigators of contributing to the explosion of the Challenger on Jan. 28. (AP Photo/Pool)

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Arlene Dressler, right, holds her 4-year-old daughter Beth Ellen during a memorial service for teacher Christa McAuliffe at St. John's Church in Concord, New Hampshire, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 1986. McAuliffe was killed in the explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger on Tuesday. (AP Photo/David Tenenbaum)

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An unidentified woman weeps quietly during a memorial service at Brookside Church in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Thursday, Jan. 30, 1986 in honor of the crew of the Space Shuttle Challenger, who were killed in an explosion aboard the spacecraft on Tuesday. Concord, N.H., teacher Christa McAuliffe was among the seven on board. (AP Photo/Peter Southwick)

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Kennedy Space Center workers enroute to Pad 39B were met by the sight of seven small American flags along side the road, Jan. 30, 1986. Seven crew members were killed in the explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger on Tuesday which was launched from Pad 39B. (AP Photo/Phil Sandlin)

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An estimated crowd of 2,500 people gathered around the foot of the State House steps in Concord, New Hampshire, Jan. 31, 1986 to participate in a memorial service for Concord High School teacher Christa McAuliffe who was killed in the Space Shuttle Challenger explosion on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Bob LaPree)

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Diana Zeppiene, carrying a model of the Space Shuttle, and Eric Olson, carrying a folded American flag, walk down the aisle of Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church in Melbourne, Florida on Thursday, Jan. 30, 1986 during a children's mass celebrated in honor of the Challenger crew. The children presented the model and flag as symbolic offerings. (AP Photo/Joe Skipper)

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The Space Shuttle Challenger is making its final journey this week as workers transport the debris recovered after the January 28, 1986 accident to a storage site on the Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Jan. 20, 1986. An unused Minuteman Missile silo is being used to store debris. All boxes and pieces such as the one pictured here are numbered and catalogued for retrieval if necessary. (AP Photo/James Neihouse)

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The left side of the Space Shuttle Challenger is seen in a hangar at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., April 9, 1986. Reporters and photographers were allowed to see the wreckage of the shuttle for the first time today. The Challenger exploded just after takeoff on Jan. 28, killing all seven crew members. (AP Photo/Doug Jennings)

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Debris from the ill-fated Space Shuttle Challenger is unloaded by from Coast Guard cutter Dallas, Feb. 19, 1986. The explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger on January 28 killed all seven crew members. (AP Photo)

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A military honor guard carries the remains of one of the crew members of the Space Shuttle Challenger at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., on Tuesday, April 29, 1986, as the body was being transferred to Dover, Del. Seven crew members were killed in the Jan. 28th explosion. (AP Photo/Phil Sandlin)

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Former astronaut Neil Armstrong, a member of the presidential panel investigating the Space Shuttle Challenger explosion, listens to testimony before the commission in Washington, Feb. 11, 1986. David Acheson, a commission member, listens in the background. A model of the shuttle sits on the table. (AP Photo/Scott Stewart)

Description

The American space shuttle Challenger exploded shortly after liftoff on January 28, 1986 in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The disaster took the lives of seven astronauts, including the most high profile crew member, 37-year-old teacher Christa McAuliffe of Concord, New Hampshire, who won a spot through NASA’s Teacher in Space program. The cause of the accident was determined to be due to unusually cold weather on the morning of the launch, with the low temperature causing the failure of two rubber O-rings that sealed the joint between the sections of the rocket booster. The shuttle made nine successful journeys prior to 1986. (Associated Press photos)